Google Granted Design Patent on Camera Bracelet

This design patent shows off a camera mounted on a bracelet. It doesn’t tell us anything about the camera beyond showing off the design of the camera. I looked for profiles of the inventors listed on the patent, and I think the ones I found may be the ones involved in the creation of this design (though I can’t be completely certain). There does looks like there is some hardware design involving cameras among the skills in the profiles I found. We will have to keep our eyes open for news of a camera like this potentially made by people building things like the cameras built for off street views of Street Views – It’s possible that this camera could be a way of indexing the world, like street view cameras are, rather than a consumer product.

Among the named inventors is:

1. A Staff Optical Engineer at Google
2. An Engineering Leader and Former Google Principal Engineer now at Uber, who worked on Geographic Maps and indoor maps at Google
3. A System Design/Systems engineer who worked on Street View and Google Art Project
4. A Senior Industrial Designer at Google who has developed a photography app for iPhones named Pic and Click in 2013

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Meeting the Demands of a Faster Mobile-Based Web

Apple has a new patent aimed at accelerating mobile Web pages. We’ve heard that from others elsewhere on the Web, and it’s beginning to look like a trend. Who wants faster web pages on their phones?

Probably everybody.

Apple Accerated Pages

It’s become increasingly obvious to people doing Search Engine Optimization that improving the quality of websites has meant making pages of a site faster and mobile-device friendly as more people started accessing the internet through phones and tablets as their primary connection to the Web.

Both Google and Yahoo helped site owners by releasing tools that could be used to check upon how fast sites were. Google introduced the online tool Pagespeed for Insights, which details steps that a site owner could take to improve the speed of a site. Yahoo published a browser extension called YSlow that runs a site through a number of tests or Heuristics that measure things that could be changed or improved on a site to make it faster.

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Twitter Poll – How Does Google Index Content on the Web?

Google Indexes by Websites, Pages, or URLs

I thought this was an interesting question to ask people because I think it’s often misunderstood. Google treats content found at different URLs as if it is different content, even though it might be the same, such as in the following examples:

http://www.example.com
https://www.example.com
http://example.com
http://example.com/index.htm
http://example.com/Index.htm
http://example.com/default.asp

One of the most interesting papers I’ve come across on this topic is this one (One of the authors joined Google shortly after this was released – Ziv Bar-Yossef):

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How Google May Respond to Reverse Engineering of Spam Detection

The ultimate goal of any spam detection system is to penalize “spammy” content.

~ Reverse engineering circumvention of spam detection algorithms (Linked to below)

Four years ago, I wrote a post about a Google patent titled, The Google Rank-Modifying Spammers Patent. It told us that Google might be keeping an eye out for someone attempting to manipulate search results by spaming pages, and Google may delay responding to someone’s manipulative actions to make them think that whatever actions they were taking didn’t have an impact upon search results. That patent focused upon organic search results, and Google’s Head of Web Spam Matt Cutts responded to my post with a video in which he insisted that just because Google produced a patent on something doesn’t mean that they were going to use it. The video is titled, “What’s the latest SEO misconception that you would like to put to rest? ” Matt’s response is as follows:

I’m not sure how effective the process in that patent was, but there is a now a similar patent from Google that focuses upon rankings of local search SEO results. The patent describes this spam problem in this way:

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The US is Asking for Help Understanding the Impacts of Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence, by Global Panorama. Some Rights Reserved
Artificial Intelligence, by Global Panorama. Some Rights Reserved

As we approach the celebration of the 4th of July, I thought it might be interesting to share a request for information made to the US Federal Register and a post on the Whitehouse blog. The US government is interested in what Artificial Intelligence might mean to the people of the United States, and how we could learn about it more. To find out, they are asking for comments by July 22, 2016.

Ed Felton, Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer wrote the following blog post about what the government would like to learn: How to Prepare for the Future of Artificial Intelligence. He tells us that the reason for the request for public input is to learn from a wide range of people about what we can do to become ready:

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Machine Learning Inside Google

By OSX - Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12890983
By OSX – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12890983

Understanding Systems

When I was in high school, one of the required classes I had to take was a shop class. I had been taking mostly what the school called “enriched” courses, or what were mostly academic classes that featured primarily reading, writing, and arithmetic. A shop class had more of a trade focus. I was surprised when the first lesson on the first day of my shop class was a richer academic experience than any of the enriched classes I had taken.

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How Google May Map a Query to an Entity for Suggestions

Search predictions come from:

– The terms you’re typing.

– What other people are searching for, including trending searches. Trending searches are popular stories in your area that change throughout the day. Trending searches aren’t related to your search history.

– Relevant searches you’ve done in the past (if you’re signed in to your Google Account and have Web & App Activity turned on).

Note: Search predictions aren’t the answer to your search, and they’re not statements by other people or Google about your search terms.

~ Search on Google using autocomplete

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Yahoo Assigns 2648 Patents to Mystery Excalibur IP, LLC Group

Google is possibly most well known for the patenting of an algorithm that sorted and ordered search results based upon a metric known as PageRank, named after Google Co-Founder Lawrence Page, while he was a student at Stanford University. Yahoo started off as a Web Directory, which became a Search Engine, and the patent it might be most well known for is one that it purchased from Overture (Originally Goto.com), and successfully sued Google with (winning a settlement out of the litigation) which describes paid search. That patent appears to have been assigned by Yahoo, along with a number of other patents last month.

A couple of weeks ago, an article on Yahoo’s patent portfolio ran, and provided some insights into what value those patents might hold. The article, Yahoo Has a Strong Patent Portfolio, But Reported Valuation is Too High gives us some ideas regarding how much the Search Engine’s patents might be worth (4 Billion?), and what they’ve been doing with them. Has Yahoo sold a good amount of those patents not much less than a week after that article? We don’t know for certain. It’s possible that they may have to one of the remaining bidders for the company: Exclusive: Yahoo’s bidder shortlist points to cash deal -sources.

On April 18th, 2016 an assignment was recorded at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) on a transaction that appears to have been executed on April 18th, 2016 involving the assignment of 2648 patents from Yahoo! Inc. to Excalibur IP, LLC. It’s possible that name is made up to hold the patents temporarily. The address that the assignment indicates is Excalibur’s is “701 FIRST AVENUE SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 94089”. A search for that address points to the headquarters of Yahoo! as we see in the knowledge panel below, so the actual purchaser appears unknown.

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