10 Most Important SEO Patents: Part 2 – The Original Historical Data Patent Filing and its Children

Imagine gathering together 10 extremely knowledgeable search engineers, locking them into a room for a couple of days with walls filled with whiteboards, with the intent of having them brainstorm ways to limit stale content and web spam from ranking highly in search results. Add to their challenge that the methods they come up with should focus upon “the nature and extent of changes over time” to web sites. Once they’ve finished, then imagine taking what appears on those whiteboards and condensing it into a patent.

The end result would likely look like Google’s patent Information Retrieval based on Historical Data. When this patent was originally published as a pending patent application awaiting prosecution and approval back on March 31, 2005, it caused quite a stir in the SEO community. Here are a few of the many reactions in forums and blog posts as a result:

  • New Google Patent Details Many Google Techniques – msgraph at Webmasterworld appears to have been the first to spot this patent and write about it publicly, and it caused quite a stir amongst the members of the forum when he did.
  • Of Sandboxes and Toolbars: Google’s New Patent Application – I caught wind of the patent, and started a thread under my forum thread name at the time, bragadocchio, working through the patent step-by-step to try to understand what implications it might have.
  • Google’s Patent – Information Retrieval Based on Historical Data – Rand very quickly worked through the patent, and captured many of the details of what it covered at SEOmoz.
  • Google’s War on SEO – Documented – A Threadwatch post discusses the impacts of many aspects of the patent, with one member calling it “The most important SEO related document in the last 5 years.”

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10 Most Important SEO Patents: Part 1 – The Original PageRank Patent Application

I like looking at patents and whitepapers and other primary sources from search engines to help me in my practice of SEO. I’ve been writing about them for more than 5 years now, and am putting together this series of the 10 Most important SEO patents to share some of what I’ve learned during that time. These aren’t patents about SEO, but rather ones that I would recommend to anyone interested in learning more about SEO by looking at patents from sources like Google or Microsoft or Yahoo.

The first PageRank patent application was never published by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), it was never assigned to a particular company or organization, and it was never granted. It avoids dense legal language and mathematics that can make reading patents difficult, and it captures the excitement of a candidate Ph.D. student, Larry Page, who has just come up with a breakthrough in indexing webpages that had the potential to be a vast improvement over other search engines at the time it was published.

The top of the cover letter for the provisional patent filing for PageRank.

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Expanded Snippets, Google’s Instant Previews, and the Costs and Benefits of Making Changes

The decision process that you go through when deciding to make changes to your site can be tough. Even if those changes are likely necessary and needed, determining the best way to implement them can make you pause, and spend a lot of time considering all the potential alternatives that you might have. You can do a cost/benefit analysis, where you consider how much change you might make to your site, what the benefits of making that change might be, and what the costs might be in both making the change and deciding not to do so.

It shouldn’t require much thought to do things like make your website more usable, but it can, especially if the changes you make change around the look and feel of your pages, and the way that people interact with them. A good example are the changes taking place at Google, where the search engine has implemented a number of new design elements over the past year or so, including new colors and formatting of their search results pages, a different look to how local search results are presented within Web search results, URLs now appearing under page titles and above snippets for pages, and Instant Previews, which show a thumbnail of a page and call out boxes of text showing where query terms appear within those thumbnails.

On the subject of those Instant Previews, one of the challenges that search engines face is presenting web pages returned from a search in a way that helps searchers locate the information they want to find. A typical search result for a web page includes a page title, a URL for the page, and a short snippet that might be taken from a meta description or from text found on the page itself. A searcher is shown a page filled with these document representions to choose from, but sometimes that’s not enough to make a decision as to what page to click through.

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Twitter Differences in Different Countries

If you’ve never used Twitter before, it can be a little intimidating when you’re first starting out. You’re faced with a message on the front page of the site telling you to “Follow your interests,” and promising “instant updates from your friends, industry experts, favorite celebrities, and what’s happening around the world.”

Then you sign up, and you’re faced with an empty text box with a question above it asking you “What’s Happening?” You have no friends added yet, you’re not following any industry experts or favorite celebrities, and there’s no news about what’s happening around the world. But you might see tweets in more languages than just English, according to a whitepaper presented last month.

Languages used in Tweets by people in the most active countries to use Twitter from a Yahoo Study.

The site does have ways to help you search for and find people to follow and interact with, and will recommend people to follow in a few places, but trying to figure out exactly what to say in that box that asks “what’s happening,” isn’t that easy. I remember spending more than a couple of days trying to figure that out myself.

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