Five Years of Google Ranking Signals

Organic Search Google Ranking Signals

1. Domain Age and Rate of Linking
2. Use of Keywords
3. Related Phrases
4. Keywords in Main Headings, Lists, and Titles
5. Page Speed
6. Watch Times for a Page
7. Context Terms on a Page
8. Language Models Using Ngrams
9. Gibberish Content
10. Authoritative Results
11. How Well Databases Answers Match Queries
12. Suspicious Activity to Increase Rankings
13. Popularity Scores for Events
14. The Amount of Weight from a Link is Based upon the Probability that someone might click upon it
15. Biometric Parameters while Viewing Results
16. Click-Throughs
17. Site Quality Scores
18. Disambiguating People
19. Effectiveness and Affinity
20. Quotes
21. Category Duration Visits
22. Repeat Clicks and Visit Durations
23. Environmental Information
24. Traffic Producing Links
25. Freshness
26. Media Consumption History
27. Geographic Coordinates
28. Low Quality
29. Television Viewing
30. Quality Rankings

Semantic Search Google Ranking Signals

31. Searches using Structured Data
32. Related Entities
33. Nearby Locations
34. Attributes of Entities
35. Natural Language Search Results

Continue reading “Five Years of Google Ranking Signals”

Google Patent on Structured Data Focuses upon JSON-LD

Search Using Structured Data

Structured Data is information that is set out in a way which makes it easy for a search engine to read easily. Some examples include XML markup in XML sitemaps and schema vocabulary found in JSON-LD scripts.

A search engine that answers questions based upon crawling and indexing facts found within structured data on a site works differently than a search engine which looks at the words used in a query, and tries to return documents that contain the same words as the ones in the query; hoping that such a matching of strings might contain an actual answer to the informational need that inspired the query in the first place. Search using Structured Data works a little differently, as seen in this flowchart from a 2017 Google patent:

Flow Chart Showing Structured Data in a Search

In Schema, Structured Data, and Scattered Databases such as the World Wide Web, I talked about the Dipre Algorithm in a patent from Sergey Brin, as I described in the post, Google’s First Semantic Search Invention was Patented in 1999. That patent and algorithm described how the web might be crawled to collect pattern and relations information about specific facts. In that case, about books. In the Google patent on structured data, we see how Google might look for factual information set out in semi-structured data such as JSON-LD, to be able to answer queries about facts, such as, “What is a book, by Ernest Hemingway, published in 1948-1952.

Continue reading “Google Patent on Structured Data Focuses upon JSON-LD”

Schema, Structured Data, and Scattered Databases such as the World Wide Web

Visiting Seattle to Speak about Structured Data

I spoke at SMX Advanced this week on Schema markup and Structured Data, as part of an introduction to its use at Google.

I had the chance to visit Seattle, and tour some of it. I took some photos, but would like to go back sometimes and take a few more, and see more of the City.

One of the places that I did want to see was Pike Place market. It was a couple of blocks away from the Hotel I stayed at (the Marriott Waterfront.)

It is a combination fish and produce market, and is home to one of the earliest Starbucks.

I could see living near the market and shopping there regularly. It has a comfortable feel to it.

Continue reading “Schema, Structured Data, and Scattered Databases such as the World Wide Web”

Google to Offer Combined Content (Paid and Organic) Search Results

Combined Content Search Results

Google Introduces Combined Content Results

This new patent is about “Combined content. What does that mean exactly? When Google patents talk about paid search, they refer to those paid results as “content” rather than as advertisements. This patent is about how Google might combine paid search results with organic results in certain instances.

The recent patent from Google (Combining Content with Search Results) tells us about how Google might identify when organic search results might be about specific entities, such as brands. It may also recognize when paid results are about the same brands, whether they might be products from those brands.

In the event that a set of search results contains high ranking organic results from a specific brand, and a paid search result from that same brand, the process described in the patent might allow for the creation of a combined content result of the organic result with the paid result.

Continue reading “Google to Offer Combined Content (Paid and Organic) Search Results”