How Google’s Knowledge Graph Updates Itself by Answering Questions

How A Knowledge Graph Updates Itself

unsplash-logoElijah Hail

To those of us who are used to doing Search Engine Optimization (SEO), we’ve been looking at URLs filled with content, and links between that content, and how algorithms such as PageRank (based upon links pointed between pages) and information retrieval scores based upon the relevance of that content have been determining how well pages rank in search results in response to queries entered into search boxes by searchers. Web pages connected by links have been seen as information points connected by nodes. This was the first generation of SEO.

Chances are good that many of the methods that we have been using to do SEO will remain the same as new features appear in search, such as knowledge panels, rich results, featured snippets, structured snippets, search by photography, and expanded schema covering many more industries and features then it does at present.

Continue reading “How Google’s Knowledge Graph Updates Itself by Answering Questions”

How Google Identifies Primary Versions of Duplicate Pages

Identifying Primary Versions of Duplicate Pages

We know that Google doesn’t penalize duplicate pages on the Web, but it may try to identify which version it prefers to other versions of the same page.

I came across this statement on the Web about duplicate pages earlier this week, and wondered about it, and decided to investigate more:

If there are multiple instances of the same document on the web, the highest authority URL becomes the canonical version. The rest are considered duplicates.

~ Link inversion, the least known major ranking factor.

Man in a cave
unsplash-logoLuke Leung

Continue reading “How Google Identifies Primary Versions of Duplicate Pages”