Category Archives: Mobile and Mobile Search Marketing

Google Acquires Patent for Eye Scan Security and Augmented Imagery

On Friday afternoon, I took a walk to the auto repair shop working on my car, about a mile and a half down the road. A phone alert made me aware of a Google Now card springing up to give me directions to the shop, and telling me that it would take me less than a minute to get there. I guess Google Now wasn’t looking at the accelerometer on my phone, or it would have realized that I was moving too slowly to be driving. I couldn’t help but think though how Google Now could be a feature that would work well in the heads up display that Google’s working on under the name Google Glass.

A screenshot from the patent showing three parts: a pair of glasses, a camera scanning someone's eye, and a view through the glasses showing a part number for a car.

As we wait to see what kinds of features might be incorporated into Google Glass, it appears that Google acquired a patent first filed a dozen years ago, granted in 2006, and recorded at the USPTO on Thursday. The patent was originally filed by Agilent Technologies, transferred to a company in Singapore in 2006, and then to Intellectual Discovery Co., located in South Korean. Google was assigned the patent on November 16, 2012, and the transaction was recorded at the USTPO on January 8, 2013.

Continue reading

Google, Electronic Textbooks, and Collaborative Schooling?

A series of Google patent applications describe the use of an electronic textbook reader application that makes using an electronic textbook a much better experience than just reading a book on a screen.

I remember lugging around a lot of books while traveling to classes on foot or my bicycle, or even while driving to law school. As an English degree undergraduate, I got away with buying a lot of my books for literature classes from a used book store (I probably left with a few hundred dollars in trade-in credit). Many of those were paperbacks that didn’t put a burden on the backpacks I wore out in those years, but many others were weighty volumes. Especially the texts from law school. I couldn’t carry all of my law school texts at the same time if I wanted – they just took up too much space.

A screenshot from the patent showing a electronic textbook reader application interface, including tabs for syllabus, book, notebook, and lectures

Google published 6 patents last week that cover different aspects of the use of electronic textbooks that attempt to capture some of the benefits of using real books while adding new value to the use of electronic texts. As the first patent I’ve listed notes:

Continue reading

Google Scores 7 Mobile Location-Based Services Patents from deCarta

On July 17th, map API provider deCarta announced the release of their third generation Javascript-based Maps API. Around a week or so earlier, a Search Engine Land article noted that deCarta had been the recipient of a number of defections from the Google Maps API after Google had announced they would start charging for the use of their API above a certain usage point.

I noticed earlier today that deCarta transferred 7 patents to Google in an assignment reported at the USPTO as being executed on July 31st and recorded with the patent office on August 28th. The patents are all older, orginally filed in 2000 through 2002. There are still 56 pending and granted patents on the USPTO site listed as assigned to deCarta at the patent office.

While the patents in this transaction are older, they still likely be relevant today to a company providing location-based services to mobile phone users. They involve such things as sharing of GPS-based (or other technology-based) locations among users and even connecting users based upon their locations. Another patent involves triggering a location based service such as receiving a notification when within a certain distance from a place such as a favorite restaurant. An additional patent involves sending advertisements to people as they approach specific businesses.

Continue reading

Google Acquires Indoor/Outdoor Wireless Location Patents

It’s no surprise that Google wants to not only map and provide location-based services in the world outdoors, but also for the insides of shopping malls, airports, museums, transit stations, and other large indoor spaces. A couple of recent tech posts brought to light an effort by Google to use a new chip from broadcom to possibly start supporting indoor positioning location and directions. From extremetech, we learned more about this technology in Think GPS is cool? IPS will blow your mind

The Broadcom chip supports IPS through WiFi, Bluetooth, and even NFC. More importantly, though, the chip also ties in with other sensors, such as a phone’s gyroscope, magnetometer, accelerometer, and altimeter. Acting like a glorified pedometer, this Broadcom chip could almost track your movements without wireless network triangulation. It simply has to take note of your entry point (via GPS), and then count your steps (accelerometer), direction (gyroscope), and altitude (altimeter).

In Betabeat’s Get Ready for IPS: Like GPS, Except the Signal Is Coming FROM INSIDE THE BUILDING we learned about the Google connection to IPS, or Indoor Positioning Systems. It appears that Google has already implemented this technology. I was pretty excited to read about how this kind of technology, and even more surprised to come across a new patent assignment listed at the USPTO earlier today. Google was assigned 85 pending and granted patents from Terahop Networks. The assignment was executed on 3/23/2012, and recorded at the USPTO on 2/23/2012.

Continue reading

Apple’s Siri Patent Application

A patent application was published today which describes the kind of intelligent automated assistant that we see in use on Apple’s iPhone 4S, known as Siri. But the patent isn’t necessarily limited to the iPhone application itself, and the describes how such a system could be used in a number of ways, including with mobile phones, PDAs, tablets, game consoles, embedded computer systems in cars, and possibly others. This assistant might provide information and services on a single client device or multiple devices, and possibly in combination with applications and information on servers as well.

A screenshot on an iPhone showing a Google Map location of a restaurant, with a demonstration next to it of information about a selected restaurant.

It could also act as an active participant in messaging platforms such as email, instant messaging, discussion forums, group chat sessions, and customer support sessions.

Continue reading

Forget Siri: Google Voice Phone Searches May Display Results on TV

Apple’s latest phone has a slick voice control feature named Siri that lets you tell your phone to do a number of different things, and can even power searches that it will answer for you. There’s been some speculation that type of verbal interaction might harm Google because it would bypass the search advertisements that are Google’s primary way of earning money. Looks like Google isn’t taking that possibility lightly.

Will the future of searching involve speech based searches that we do on our phones, with results shown on our TV? A Google patent application describes the possibility.

Images from the Google patent showing someone asking their phone when Seinfeld is on with the answers displayed on the large screen TV in front of them, and another image showing a flow of a voice search sent to a search engine and then a TV screen.

Continue reading

Google Acquires Virtual Post-it Notes Patents

Imagine being able to subscribe to a service where public service agencies, advertisers, and friends may be able to leave you mobile messages when you drive through or arrive at a specific location.

Google acquired a series of related patents earlier this month that cover this kind of location-based service, originally filed by a Fairfax Virginia based company, Xybernaut Corporation.

A screenshot from the patent showing a computer interface used as a car navigational device

A screenshot from one of the patents shows this system implemented as a navigational device, but the patent is written in a way that enables a system like this to be used by many different types of handheld devices as well. It’s possible that Google Maps Navigation could use this system, though it could also be built into other parts of a mobile phone system as well. And it has a potential social element to it as well.

The earliest of the patents was filed in December of 2000:

Continue reading

Text is Your URL: Google Acquires/Licenses Exbiblio, B.V. Technology

Use your smartphone camera to take a picture of text in a newspaper, a magazine article, or a book, and if it’s available online you can access it electronically. Take an image of a print advertisement and you may be able to visit an online transaction page to make a secure transaction.

Snap a shot of a phone number and click on it to make the call. Capture an address and you can pull up a map showing you were that address is located. In addition to Web documents, you can use Exbiblio to access your own documents on your computer.

Looking through the USPTO assignment database, I noticed that Google had been assigned a majority of the pending and granted patents assigned to Exbiblio this past February. The video below describes some of the features and functionality that Exbibilio’s technology offers, and notes that their intellectual property is available for licensing.

Continue reading