Related Questions now use a Question Graph and are Joined by ‘People Also Search For’ Refinements

I recently bought a lemon tree and wanted to learn how to care for it. I started asking about it at Google, which provided me with other questions and answers related to caring for a lemon tree. As I clicked upon some of those, others were revealed that gave me more information that was helpful.

Last March, I wrote a post about Related Questions at Google, Google’s Related Questions Patent or ‘People Also Ask’ Questions.

Related Questions Patent Updated to Include a Question Graph

As Barry Schwartz noted recently at Search Engine Land, Google is now also showing alternative query refinements as ‘People Also Search For’ listings, in the post, Google launches a new look for ‘people also search for’ search refinements. That was enough to have me look to see if the original “Related Questions” patent was updated by Google. It was. A continuation patent was granted in June of last year, with the same name, but updated claims

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Google’s Mobile Location History

If you use Google Maps to navigate from place to place, or if you have agreed to be a local guide for Google Maps, there is a chance that you have seen Google Mobile Location history information. There is a Google Account Help page about how to Manage or delete your Location History. The location history page starts off by telling us:

Your Location History helps you get better results and recommendations on Google products. For example, you can see recommendations based on places you’ve visited with signed-in devices or traffic predictions for your daily commute.

You may see this history as your timeline, and there is a Google Help page to View or edit your timeline. This page starts out by telling us:

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Does Google Use Latent Semantic Indexing?

Railroad Turntable Sign
Technology evolves and changes over time.

There was a park in the town in Virginia where I used to live that had been a railroad track that was turned into a walking path. At one place near that track was a historic turntable where cargo trains might be unloaded so that they could be added to later trains or trains headed in the opposite direction. This is a technology that is no longer used but it is an example of how technology changes and evolves over time.

Latent Semantic Indexing is Old Technology

Some people doing SEO claim that Google is using Latent Semantic Indexing because they believe that by saying that they are saying that Google is using synonyms and semantically related words. But Latent Semantic Indexing is an old patented technology that doesn’t just mean that Google is using synonyms and semantically related words. Google does like synonyms and Semantics, but they don’t call it Latent Semantic Indexing, and for an SEO to use those terms can be misleading, and confusing to clients who look up Latent Semantic Indexing and see something very different.

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Google Targeted Advertising, Part 1

Google targeted Ads

One of the inventors of the newly granted patent I am writing about was behind one of the most visited Google patents I’ve written about, from Ross Koningstein, which I posted about under the title, The Google Rank-Modifying Spammers Patent It described a social engineering approach to stop site owners from using spammy tactics to raise the ranking of pages.

This new patent is about targeted advertising at Google in paid search, which I haven’t written too much about here. I did write one post about paid search, which I called, Google’s Second Most Important Algorithm? Before Google’s Panda, there was Phil I started that post with a quote from Steven Levy, the author of the book In the Plex, which goes like this:

They named the project Phil because it sounded friendly. (For those who required an acronym, they had one handy: Probabilistic Hierarchical Inferential Learner.) That was bad news for a Google Engineer named Phil who kept getting emails about the system. He begged Harik to change the name, but Phil it was.

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Google May Diminish Reviews of Places You Stop Visiting

Google Timeline Reviews

How Google May Diminish Reviews Based on Location History

I don’t consider myself paranoid, but after reading a lot of Google patents, I’ve been thinking of my phone as my Android tracking device. It’s looking like Google thinks of phones similarly; paying a lot of attention to things such as a person’s location history. After reading a recent patent, I’m fine with Google continuing to look at my location history, and reviews that I might write, even though there may not be any financial benefit to me. When I write a review of a business at Google, it’s normally because I’ve either really liked that place or disliked it, and wanted to share my thoughts about it with others.

A Google patent application filed and published by the search engine, but not yet granted is about reviews of businesses.

It tells us about how Google might diminish reviews for businesses because of my location history.

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Semantic Keyword Research and Topic Models

Seeing Meaning

I went to the Pubcon 2017 Conference this week in Las Vegas Nevada and gave a presentation about Semantic Search topics based upon white papers and patents from Google. My focus was on things such as Context Vectors and Phrase-Based Indexing.

I promised in social media that I would post the presentation on my blog so that I could answer questions if anyone had any.

I’ve been doing Semantic keyword research like this for years, where I’ve looked at other pages that rank well for keyword terms that I want to use, and identify phrases and terms that tend to appear upon those pages, and include them on pages that I am trying to optimize. It made a lot of sense to start doing that after reading about phrase based indexing in 2005 and later.

Some of the terms I see when I search for Semantic Keyword Research include such things as “improve your rankings,” and “conducting keyword research” and “smarter content.” I’m seeing phrases that I’m not a fan of such as “LSI Keywords” which has as much scientific credibility as Keyword Density, which is next to none. There were researchers from Bell Labs, in 1990, who wrote a white paper about Latent Semantic Indexing, which was something that was used with small (less than 10,000 documents) and static collections of documents (the web is constantly changing and hasn’t been that small for a long time.)

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