Google to Offer Combined Content (Paid and Organic) Search Results

Combined Content Search Results

Google Introduces Combined Content Results

This new patent is about “Combined content. What does that mean exactly? When Google patents talk about paid search, they refer to those paid results as “content” rather than as advertisements. This patent is about how Google might combine paid search results with organic results in certain instances.

The recent patent from Google (Combining Content with Search Results) tells us about how Google might identify when organic search results might be about specific entities, such as brands. It may also recognize when paid results are about the same brands, whether they might be products from those brands.

In the event that a set of search results contains high ranking organic results from a specific brand, and a paid search result from that same brand, the process described in the patent might allow for the creation of a combined content result of the organic result with the paid result.

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PageRank Update

PageRank Update by Google

The original PageRank patent, assigned to Stanford University, has expired. Google had an exclusive license to use PageRank. Google filed a PageRank update, with a different algorithm behind it. The PageRank patent filed by Google has been updated. It does cover PageRank, as it describes in the description to the patent which tells us this about PageRank:

A popular search engine developed by Google Inc. of Mountain View, Calif. uses PageRank.RTM. as a page-quality metric for efficiently guiding the processes of web crawling, index selection, and web page ranking. Generally, the PageRank technique computes and assigns a PageRank score to each web page it encounters on the web, wherein the PageRank score serves as a measure of the relative quality of a given web page with respect to other web pages. PageRank generally ensures that important and high-quality web pages receive high PageRank scores, which enables a search engine to efficiently rank the search results based on their associated PageRank scores.

~ Producing a ranking for pages using distances in a web-link graph

A continuation patent showing a PageRank update was granted today. The original version of this PageRank patent was filed in 2006 and reminded me a lot of Yahoo’s TrustRank (which is cited by the patent’s applicants as one of a large number of documents that this new version of the patent is based upon.)

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Search Engine Queries Build Ontologies to Change Search

How Search Engine Queries Might be Used to Build Ontologies

What are query stream ontologies, and how might they change search?

Search Engine Queries

Search engines trained us to use keywords when we searched – to try to guess what words or phrases might be the best ones to use to try to find something we are interested in. That we might have a situational or informational need to find out more about. Keywords were an important and essential part of SEO – trying to get pages to rank highly in search results for certain keywords found in search engine queries that people would search for. SEOs still optimize pages for keywords, hoping to use a combination of information retrieval relevance scores and link-based PageRank scores, to get pages to rank highly in search results.

With Google moving towards a knowledge-based attempt to find “things” rather than “strings”, we are seeing patents that focus upon returning results that provide answers to questions in response to search engine queries. One of those from January describes how query stream ontologies might be created from search engine queries, that can be used to respond to fact-based questions using information about attributes of entities.

There is a white paper from Google co-authored by the same people who are the inventors of this patent published around the time this patent was filed in 2014, and it is worth spending time reading through. The paper is titled, Biperpedia: An Ontology for Search Applications

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Google Related Questions now use a Question Graph

I recently bought a lemon tree and wanted to learn how to care for it. I started asking about it at Google, which provided me with other questions and answers related to caring for a lemon tree. As I clicked upon some of those, others were revealed that gave me more information that was helpful.

Last March, I wrote a post about Google Related Questions, Google’s Related Questions Patent or “People Also Ask” Questions.

Google Related Questions Patent Updated to Include a Question Graph

As Barry Schwartz noted recently at Search Engine Land, Google is now also showing alternative query refinements as ‘People Also Search For’ listings, in the post, Google launches a new look for “people also search for” search refinements. That was enough to have me look to see if the original Google Related Questions patent was updated. It was. A continuation patent was granted in June of last year, with the same name, but updated claims

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Google’s Mobile Location History

Google does track your mobile location history if you use Google Maps to navigate to places.

mobile location history

If you use Google Maps to navigate from place to place, or if you have agreed to be a local guide for Google Maps, there is a chance that you have seen Google Mobile Location history information. There is a Google Account Help page about how to Manage or delete your Location History. The mobile location history page starts off by telling us:

Your Location History helps you get better results and recommendations on Google products. For example, you can see recommendations based on places you’ve visited with signed-in devices or traffic predictions for your daily commute.

You may see this history as your timeline, and there is a Google Help page to View or edit your timeline. This page starts out by telling us:

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Does Google Use Latent Semantic Indexing?

Railroad Turntable Sign
Technology evolves and changes over time.

There was a park in the town in Virginia where I used to live that had been a railroad track that was turned into a walking path. At one place near that track was a historic turntable where cargo trains might be unloaded so that they could be added to later trains or trains headed in the opposite direction. This is a technology that is no longer used but it is an example of how technology changes and evolves over time.

Latent Semantic Indexing is Old Technology

Some people claim that Google is using Latent Semantic Indexing because they believe that by saying that they are saying that Google is using synonyms and semantically related words.

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